Archive for the ‘Conroe Texas’ Tag

Conroe’s Corner Pub   2 comments

Sonny Boy Terry & Michael Durbin-HopperSonny Boy Terry and Michael Durbin In Conroe’s Corner Pub (04/14/07) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“The more one loves music,

the less music one loves.”

— Really?!!

I was going through some of my brother’s notes on music this morning and came upon the Roger Sessions statement, “The more one loves music, the less music one loves.” From my own personal experience, there is music I may not have liked but learned to love it.

So, I decided to research the context of what Sessions was saying.

“. . . this initial stage in listening to music is an entirely direct one; the listener brings to the music whatever he can bring, with no other preoccupation than that of hearing. This is, of course, what is to be desired; it is the condition of his really hearing. He will hear the music only to the extent that he identifies himself with it, establishing a fresh and essentially naive contact with it, without preconceived ideas and without strained effort.

. . . the listener’s reaction is immediate and seems, in a sense, identical with the act of hearing. Undoubtedly this is what many listeners expect. And yet, on occasion, one may listen to music attentively, without any conscious response to it until afterward; one’s very attention may be so absorbed that a vivid sense of the sound is retained, but a sense of communications experienced only later. It is this sense of communication to which I refer under the term ‘enjoyment’; obviously, one may not and often does not, in any real sense, ‘enjoy’ what is being communities. There is certainly some music that we never ‘enjoy’; experience inevitably fosters discrimination, and there is certainly some truth even in the frequent, seemingly paradoxical statement that ‘the more one loves music, the less music one loves.’ This statement is true in a sense if we understand it as applying to the experience of an individual, and not a general rule. But if our relation to the music is a healthy one — that is to say, a direct and simple one — our primary and quite spontaneous effort will to deny it.”

The more you learn about something you like, the more you will love it.

— kenne

 

 

“Original Pat Green”   2 comments

Patrict Green-2-art-72“Original Pat Green” (2004)– Photo-Artistry by kenne

Like so many people the past St. Patrick’s Day, we were sheltered-in-place and missed celebrating the 17th the only way it should be, with friends. So I turned to the many photos of St. Patrick’s Day I have taken over the years, and I have many. At first, I was thinking about doing a collage, but then I found this one of a friend, Patrick A. Green. Starting in 1995, Pat and friends would meet on the Court House Square in Conroe, parade around the Square, and party at the Corner Pub on the Square.

Pat practiced law in Conroe for 43 years, retiring in 2015. A man of limitless generosity, the “Original Pat Green,” gave freely of whatever he had to whomever he met. With unbridled enthusiasm for his Irish and Cajun heritage, Pat could host a party unlike any other. Through his magnanimous spirit and disarming humor, he possessed an extraordinary ability to bring people together.

Pat died on July 12, 2016. He was an original, and I’m blessed to have known him. Somewhere in the universe, he is still partying!

— kenne

You Do What You Have To Do   Leave a comment

Bryan Lee2006-06-10-26-art-72Bryan Lee — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Blues musician Bryan (Braille Blues Daddy) Lee has been a fixture on Bourbon Steet for
four decades. He was frequently a live music stop for us during our many trips to New Orleans
during our time living in the Houston area.
We first saw him at the Old Absinthe House on Bourbon Street. 

When Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, like a lot of New Orleans musicians he began
touring more through Texas and up into the mid-west. In 2006 we saw him and his
band at a live music bar in Conroe, Texas north of Houston. The above photo artistry
image was created from a photo taken during one of his stops in Conroe.

— kenne

 

The Society Of The Fifth Cave Christmas Celebration, 2009   Leave a comment

Cave Christmas 2009The Society of the Fifth Cave Christmas Celebration, December 19, 2009

The Society of the Fifth Cave, “A Reading Club for the Non-Discriminating Bourgeoisie,” has existed in one form are another, since 1983. I became a member in 1998. The last time I was able to attend one of our monthly meetings was September 2012

— kenne

“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome,
dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
May your mountains rise into and above the clouds.”

— Edward Abbey

Friend, AJ Murphy   Leave a comment

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFriend, AJ Murphy — Photo-Artistry by kenne

AJ Murphy past away 2003, a close friend
and the heart and soul of a young organization,
“Friends of The Blues, Montgomery County.”
In May of that year, the Friends held a celebration
at the Texas Arts Venue in downtown Conroe, Texas.
Click here for an article that appeared in the Houston Chronicle.

— kenne

The Power Of The Spoken Word   Leave a comment

SlamWinner IIIorg grunge art blogBlue Bonnet Poetry Slam Winner, Conroe, Texas, April 2004 — Image by kenne

“Keep’n the Blues Alive” — Ten Years Out   Leave a comment

bryan-lee2007-06-02-01keepingxMember of Bryan Lee’s Band Taking A Break Outside the Corner Pub (June 2, 2007), Conroe, Texas — Image by kenne

Bryan Lee (1 of 1)-Art blog IIComputer Art by kenne

“I always thought that one man, the lone balladeer
with a guitar, could blow a whole army off the stage,
if he knew what he was doing. I’ve seen it happen.”

— Bob Dylan

 

Conroe, Texas   Leave a comment

B&W (1 of 1) Conroe Art blog(March 2004) — Image by kenne

A damp gulf coast night
on a slow Tuesday evening —
Rover on the move.

— kenne

 

“Snodgrass Is Walking Through the Universe”   Leave a comment

dave-w-d-kenne-1-of-1-bw-blogDavid Parsons, W.D. Snodgrass and Kenne Turner (Conroe, Texas, 1999)

In 1999 I had the honor of spending an evening with the poet, W.D. Snodgrass, first at a reading at the Conroe library, finishing off the evening at the Hofbrau Steaks. Since then I have continued to enjoy reading the personal nature of his poems, and he will forever remain in my heart — “Snodgrass is walking through the universe.”

kenne

THESE TREES STAND . . .

These trees stand very tall under the heavens.
While they stand, if I walk, all stars traverse
This steep celestial gulf their branches chart.
Though lovers stand at sixes and at sevens
While civilizations come down with the curse,
Snodgrass is walking through the universe.

I can’t make any world go around your house.
But note this moon. Recall how the night nurse
Goes ward-rounds, by the mild, reflective art
Of focusing her flashlight on her blouse.
Your name’s safe conduct into love or verse;
Snodgrass is walking through the universe.

Your name’s absurd, miraculous as sperm
And as decisive. If you can’t coerce
One thing outside yourself, why you’re the poet!
What irrefrangible atoms whirl, affirm
Their destiny and form Lucinda’s skirts!
She can’t make up your mind. Soon as you know it,
Your firmament grows touchable and firm.
If all this world runs battlefield or worse,
Come, let us wipe our glasses on our shirts:
Snodgrass is walking through the universe.

—W.D. Snodgrass

Poetry Slam Winner   2 comments

sSlamWinner IIIorg grunge art blogBluebonnet Poetry Slam Winner (April 24, 2004) — Grunge Art by kenne

Based on the premise that a good poem deserves a good performance, in November 1984 a Chicago construction worker, Marc (Slam Papi) Smith, started an open mic night at the Get Me High lounge called the “Monday Night Poetry Reading.”  This was the beginning of the Poetry Slam movement. The signature of Mark’s led slams was the audience yelling,”SO WHAT?!” It was his way of declaring that everyone in the room was just as important for participating as he was for starting the movement.

In the early 2000’s, Carol and Stan Schneider started the Bluebonnet Poetry Slam in Conroe, Texas. Like in Chicago, in the beginning the Bluebonnet Poetry Slam took place in saloons in the Conroe area, and yes, we brought in Marc to conduct the slams. The slams became so popular, the organizers began to work in conjunction with the Friends of Conroe to schedule the annual event at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds where 300-400 attended the event, which attracted some of the best slam poets from around the country. In 2001 & 2002 the Bluebonnet Slam winner was National Poetry Slam champion, Taylor Mali. (See Taylor preform in video below.)

In time the Bluebonnet Poetry Slam died as a result of it’s popularity and moving out of a more intimate saloon setting. Poetry slams must have that “SO WHAT?” element where it can give poetry a stage to say what poets say is valuable, even when we don’t reach the complete potential of a given poem. Slams bring poetry back to its origins, an art experienced through oration and performance, rather than strictly in print.

In a true sense of the word, poetry slams are grunge poetry.

kenne

Just A Little Country Blues   1 comment

Hayes Carll 7.30.07_0055 II Grunge Art blog chances areHayes Carll, Heritage Place, Conroe, Texas (August 2, 2007) — Computer art by kenne

“I’m gonna holler and I’m gonna scream
I’m gonna get me some mescaline
She brings me roses and a place to lean
A drunken poets dream”

— Hayes Carll

We All Need The Blues   1 comment

Texas Johnny Brown_edit blogTexas Johnny Brown at Shakespeare’s Pub, Houston — Image kenne

We all need the blues

To better understand life

All its ups and downs.

— kenne

Bryan Lee2006-06-10-21_edit blog framedBryan Lee at The Corner Pub, Conroe — Image by kenne

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