Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

Patio Cactus Blossoms   1 comment

Patio Cactus Blossoms — Image by kenne

It may have been a bad year for wildflowers in the Sonoran Desert,

however, the cactus plants are making up for the drought. 

— kenne

Round-tailed Ground Squirrel   1 comment

Round-tailed Ground Squirrel — Images by kenne

Round-tailed ground squirrels are comparatively small animals with grayish-brown coloring that matched the
sandy soils of their environment. Their unique characteristics are, most noticeably, their long, slender, rounded
tail, and secondly, their long, wide, hairy hind feet. Their claws and their small ears positioned low on the head,
enable them to live underground in a lifestyle that is semi-fossorial. They are often mistaken for prairie dogs or
gophers, but prairie dogs are much larger and gophers do not forage above ground.
— Source: Animalia 

 

Budding Season For Saguaro Cactus   Leave a comment

Budding Season For Saguaro Cactus (Sabino Canyon) — Images by kenne

Mexican Olive Blossoms   2 comments

Mexican Olive Blossoms (Cordia boissieri) — Images by kenne

This time of year, we get up earlier 

with daylight coming earlier to begin 
our morning walk while it’s still cool 
here in the desert. Now that I’m doing less hiking, 
it’s important to get the morning walks in. 
At my age, the key some mornings is not to 
walk faster and longer; it is to aim for continuation — 
got to keep on moving.

 
We were expecting rain overnight, 
expecting my walk might be delayed. 
When it does rain, I can hear it on the skylight; 
not hearing any, I knew there was no by daylight. 
The walk took place on schedule, 
commenting to other walkers, 
“the forecast was wrong.” 
We did get some rain after breakfast, 
not enough for the rain gauge to measure.
 
— kenne

Creosote Bush Blossoms   2 comments

Spring In The Sonoran Desert — Image by kenne

The Creosote bush is a plant of extremes: it is a widely used medicinal plant; it is the most drought tolerant
perennial in North America, and it may be the oldest living plant.

 

Creosote (Larrea tridentata), also known as greasewood, is the most common shrub in three of the four north American deserts.
It is too cold in the Great Basin Desert of Nevada, but it thrives in the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan deserts.
Creosote is an evergreen shrub, commonly up to six feet tall or taller, that has tiny green leaves, yellow flowers,
and grey-fuzzy fruit. It flowers several times a year depending on rainfall. —
Source: Arizona Daily Independent

Ravens Gathering On The Ridge   1 comment

Ravens Gathering On The Ridge — Image by kenne

Ravens on the ridge

Gather for the funeral

Death is without end.

— kenne

 

Agave Plant   Leave a comment

Agave Plant — Image by kenne

“Nearly all agaves, along with most bromeliads such as pineapple, are somewhat peculiar in their flowering habit.
They grow vegetatively for many years (though not the hundred years that gave rise to the common name of
century plant) without producing a single flower, and then when they get the urge to reproduce, they send
forth an enormous stalk with hundreds and hundreds of them. These plants that flower and set seed only once
in their lives are called monocarpic.”
— Source: Succulent Gardens

Thistles In Molino Basin   Leave a comment

Thistles in Molino Basin — Image by kenne

The Early Bird Gets The Nectar   Leave a comment

“The Early Bird Gets the Nectar” (White-winged Dove on Saguaro Cactus Buds) — Image by kenne

In April, the budding of saguaros is followed by the return of white-winged doves from Mexico who love the nectar in
the saguaro blossoms. This image captures a white-winged dove atop buds soon to blossom — another take on
“The early bird gets the worm.”

— kenne

Another Year of Few Wildflowers   Leave a comment

Another Year of Few Wildflowers In The Sonoran Desert — Image by kenne

Spring wildflowers in the Sonoran desert depend on fall and winter rains. When there are little to no rains, as
has been the last few years, then there are few wildflowers in the spring. The above image is in the Molino
Basin, where in non-drought years, there are plenty of wildflowers to photograph. This year there are only a
few patches to be found.

— kenne

Fencepost   1 comment

Fencepost — Image by kenne

Fencepost

I’ve been told
that I’m built like a fencepost
Kind of wiry
A few knobs here and there
A knot or two for character
I make a pretty good fence
Good at keeping things inside
Not letting things out
But now my shadow seems leaner
Not quite as tall in the morning sun
The soil around my feet eroding
Drying out isn’t all it’s cracked up to be
Staying straight ain’t easy
The herd is getting restless
And the barbed wire on my back
is tearing me up inside.

A Reflection Selfie   Leave a comment

A Reflection Selfie (Puerto Penasco, Mexico) — Image by kenne

I set my camera on top of the balcony wall during a stay at a resort in Puerto Penasco, April 12, 2013. — kenne

A Gila Monster Spring   Leave a comment

A Gila Monster Spring (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

Gila monsters are heavy-bodied lizards covered with beadlike scales, called osteoderms, that are black and
yellow or pink covering all but their belly. The Gila monster is venomous; its venom is made by a row of glands
in the lizard’s lower jaw. When the lizard bites, small grooves in the teeth help the venom flow into its prey. The
bite of a Gila monster is very strong, and the lizard may not loosen its grip for several seconds. It may even
chew so that the venom goes deeper into the wound. 

As the name might suggest, the Gila (pronounced HEE-la) monster has one of the worst reputations in the
reptile world. This lizard is often feared and has been described as frightful and repulsive, especially in local
folklore.
Source: San Diego Zoo

Palo Verde Trees In The Spring   1 comment

Palo Verde Trees In the Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

The palo verde tree is Arizona’s state tree, and rightfully so since once established, these trees truly need no
supplemental water to live. The tree’s bark is green and can photosynthesize something that in most plants,
only leaves do. This characteristic also allows the leaves to be very small and drop off during extreme drought conditions.

In the Sonoran desert, there are four types of palo verde trees. The above image illustrates two; the Blue Palo Verde
on the left and the Foothills Palo Verde on the right. The Blue Palo Verde will generally bloom first in the spring,
followed by the Foothills a few weeks later. During April, you can see these trees blooming everywhere in Tucson.

— kenne

A Grassy Meadow Known As Thimble Flat   Leave a comment

A Grassy Meadow Known as Thimble Flat  (Thimble Peak On the Left) — Image by kenne

Thimble Flat

We gathered early one November morning,

now we were going to turn words into action 

by hiking six miles to climb Thimble Peak.

Starting at the Gordon Hirabayashi Campground, 

we hiked the Sycamore Canyon trail to the

Bear Canyon trail, then leaving the trail at a flat

grassy meadow called Thimble Flat to traverse

around a deep gulley, making our way through rocks

and brush to the base of Thimble Peak, where we paused

to determine the best way to climb this pinnacle on a

mountain ridge, overlooking Tucson known as Thimble Peak.

— kenne

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