Archive for the ‘Aquatic Plants’ Category

Spring Yard Flowers Around Our Tucson Home — A Photo Essay   Leave a comment

Late Spring Flowers in the Desert — Images by kenne
(Click on any of the tiled images for a larger view in a slideshow format.)

 

Saguaros Under Attack — A Photographic Essay   2 comments

Saguaros are a very slow-growing cactus. A plant two feet in height may be 16 years old on its way to 25 feet and over 175 years old.

In the early years of life they are more susceptible to heat, drought and freezing temperatures. By the time they are five feet or more they have endured many harsh conditions, and in some cases, mistreatment by humans. 

This is a photographic essay of saguaros along a popular trail in the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area. For some strange reason, some people like to cut the tops off, or in general slice these beautiful icons of the Sonoran Desert. As you can see, most are survivors, continuing their slow growth.

It is not easy to stop aggression toward nature, but through education human aggression can be better channeled. The more people can experience nature, the more likely they will develop positive feeling toward the natural environment. Most people, when asked who they are, will answer by talking about the landscape from which they come, which reflects positive feeling of familiarity and security in that environment.

When I talk
about Sabino Canyon
I mean myself,
my home,
my state of mind.
Some don’t get what I say,
maybe it’s because
we don’t talk the same language.
All I can say to those I meet:
“Try and make it to Sabino Canyon.”

kenne

Damaged Saguaro Cactus in Sabino Canyon — Images by kenne
(Click on any of the images for larger view in a slide-show format.)

Nature should be respected if it is part of the home of humans.

Abstract Art #21   1 comment

Abstract Art #21 — Image by kenne

Water Hyacinth — World’s Worst Aquatic Plant   3 comments

The Invasive Water Hyacinth Blooming on Lake Houston — Images by kenne

These beautiful blossoms photographed near the water’s edge on Lake Houston belong to the water hyacinth, one of the most productive plants on earth and is considered the world’s worst aquatic plant. By forming a dense floating mat on the water surface, they interfere with navigation, recreation, irrigation, and power generation impeding water flow, creating good breeding conditions for mosquitoes.. These thick mats create low oxygen conditions beneath the water surface excluding native submersed and floating-leaved plants.  Water hyacinths can become a severe environmental and economic problem for gulf coast states and in many other areas of the world with a sub-tropical or tropical climate, rapidly spreading throughout inland and coastal freshwater bays, lakes, and marshes. 

kenne

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