Archive for the ‘Marshall Saddle’ Tag

Hiking Sunset and Marshall Gulch Trails   3 comments

Sunset Trail July 12, 2019-6-72Hiking Sunset and Marshall Gulch Trails On Mt. Lemmon (July 12, 2019) — Images by kenne

Before beginning our SCVN Friday hike on Mt. Lemmon, we crossed paths with an old friend, Jasmine.
Jasmine is well known to those hiking on Mt. Lemmon.

Sunset Trail July 12, 2019-72.jpgIt is common for hikers to rest on Sunset Rock taking in the view, especially at sunset.

Sunset Trail July 12, 2019-2-72Looking down on a part of the Sunset Trail where a group of kids are hiking

Sunset Trail July 12, 2019-3-72We pause for the leader to hydrate and take a picture.

Sunset Trail July 12, 2019-4-72Some of the hikers decided to park their asses at Marshall Gulch.

 

Hiking In The Flow — Another Friday Hike In The Rain   1 comment

Sunset Trail HikeReturning to Marshall Gulch for cover — Images by kenne

This week’s hike was from the Sunset trailhead to Marshall Gulch, up to Marshall saddle and back to the Sunset trailhead. Because of heavy rain and unnerving lightning, we turned back before reaching the saddle. Since one of our cars was at the Marshall Gulch trailhead, all the drivers were taken back to the Sunset trailhead, returning to rescue the remaining wet hikers.

This is my fourth or fifth time hiking Sunset trail, which I prefer to call Sunrise, since the hikes are always in the morning, but I’ve never hiked the trail in the sun — it’s always been cloudy with at least a misty rain. Yesterday was the first time for the rain to be heavy on this hike.

It’s nice to get the much-needed rain on the mountains, only if we could get some of it in the valley. At least the rain on the mountains is flowing down to Sabino Canyon and the dam area — the latest report is that the Sonoran Desert Toads are breast-stroking and piggy-back riding around the pools croaking contentedly. There’s a 30 % chance of rain again today.

As with the mountain streams, hiking and life is all about the flow — “being completely involved in an activity for its own sake. The ego falls away. Time flies. Every action, movement, and thought follows inevitably from the previous one, like playing jazz. Your whole being is involved, and you’re using your skills to the utmost.”

“The fact that you were completely immersed in what you were doing, that the concentration was very high, that you knew what you had to do moment by moment, that you had very quick and precise feedback as to how well you were doing, and that you felt that your abilities were stretched but not overwhelmed by the opportunities for action. In other words, the challenges were in balance with the skills. And when those conditions were present, you began to forget all the things that bothered you in everyday life, forget the self as an entity separate from what was going on — you felt you were a part of something greater and you were just moving along with the logic of the activity.” — Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

kenne

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Marshall Gulch photo (8) blogiPhone image by Jeff

Hiking In The Rain Builds Hat Character   3 comments

Wilderness Rocks_20120705_0420 blogClouds begin to move into the Wilderness Rock area.

Wilderness Rocks_20120705_0423 blogKenne at Marshall Saddle with Wilderness Rock trail behind me as the rain continued.

One of my favorite hiking trails on Mount Lemmon is the Wilderness Rock trail, which is reached by taking Marshall Gulch #3 to Marshall Saddle, where you take Wilderness Rock tail to Lemmon Rock trail — the combination of which is my “Wilderness Rocks Hike.” Yesterday, this hike was really rocking!

I was the lead for the weekly SCVN Friday hike, with Edi Moore and Dan Collins assisting. We guided seven hikers on this six-mile, 850′ elevation change hike through a beautiful part of Mount Lemmon. Because I was the lead, I was only carrying my point and shoot camera, which turned out to be a great decision not take my Nikon D800. Even though I was carrying a plastic bag for the camera and a poncho to help stay dry, the rain and the length of time in it resulted in everything getting wet.

Edi was the tail guide, Dan in the middle and I in the lead. Even though we had checked our two-way radios at the trail head, I was having trouble communicating with Edi, who was falling back with a slow hiker (Dave). At a point just past the Marshall Saddle, they turned back. Dan was able to get part of Edi’s message about having lunch before returning to Marshall Gulch. 

Meanwhile, we continued on to Lemmon Rock trail, stopping for a snack. Before starting out return, I took the above photo as clouds began to move in. Shortly after staring the return hike, it began to rain. The rain was steady with plenty lightning and some small hail. When the lightning sounded closer, we sought cover  next to some of the large boulders near the trail.

One of the things you learn about mountain trails is they become streams in heavy rain. Mount Lemmon recorded about 2″ of rain.

As we continued our return the rain and lightning was creating more of a sense of urgency with the faster hikers, so I picked up the pace. Dan was setting a slower pace with Bonnie, who was doing fine, but was six months out from knee surgery. Dan and I were able to maintain communication with our radios. 

It was still raining when we returned to Marshall Gulch, where we were expecting to see Edi and Dave waiting at the trail head — but no sign of them. Knowing that it was not like Edi to leave without letting us know, Dan and I were concerned. As it turned out, Edi had tried to communicate via the problem radio that she would be returning to Tucson with Dave. Since we were all soaking wet, leaving a note was not possible. 

After returning to Tucson, which had not received any rain at the base of Catalina Highway, I called Edi. Her returned with Dave was stranger that fiction. Dave has a two-seater convertible. Apparently, he had a problem locking down the top, so they drove the 29 mile return down the Catalina Highway, with the top off, in rain and hail — yes hail. I don’t know how much hail was falling on them, but I do know that on our return (approximately 30 minutes later), there were areas along the highway where there was so much hail on the ground it looked snow-covered. Water was falling in currents off the rocks, washing large pieces of the nearby cliffs — it was freaky! Edi will have to tell her story.

Some may conclude that this was a “hike from hell,” but not for me. The resulting challenges brought back youthful memories — it was invigorating!

kenne

Hiking Wilderness Of Rocks Trail On Mt. Lemmon — Part II   Leave a comment

Along The Wilderness of Rocks Trail — Images by kenne

To get to the Wilderness of Rocks Trail, the hiker takes Marshall Gulch Trail #3 to the Marshall Saddle. One of the trail options at the saddle is the Wilderness of Rocks. Click here for more information on trails out of Marshall Gulch.

kenne

Hiking From Marshall Gulch Up To Marshall Saddle On To Wilderness Rocks Trail   Leave a comment

Recent storms on the mountain downed this old ponderosa or Arizona pine (not sure which, if either). Image by kenne

Last Friday, we were hiking with the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) from Marshall Gulch up to Marshall Saddle on to Wilderness Rocks. This particular hike took place after an early morning shower, with temps in the upper 50’s. The high humidity made it feel like we were hiking in the great northwest, not in southeast Arizona just 45 minutes north of  Tucson. Recent rains  have given life to the mountain streams and brought on many beautiful wildflowers — a great place for naturalists. This time of year, the mountain provides a great hiking escape from the summer desert.

kenne

(Flickr Slideshow)

Photos and video by kenne

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