Archive for the ‘Kae Tempest’ Tag

Sleepy Orange & Dainty Sulphur Butterflies   Leave a comment

Sleepy Orange & Dainty Sulphur Butterflies On Narrow-leaf Aster Wildflowers (Santa Catalina Mountains) — Image by kenne

“And anyway, what is the difference between self-knowledge and self-obsession?
One encourages a defeat of the ego, the other encourages a feeding of the ego.
One a deeper experience of connection to ourselves, which enables a more 
nourishing connection to others. The other, disdain for the deeper needs of the self,
which leads to disdain of others.”

— from On Connection by Kae Tempest

Kae Is Getting More Attention   Leave a comment

Kae Tempest — Photo-Artistry by kenne from a Photo by Wolfgang Tillmans

A couple of years ago, I posted: “I’m a new fan of Kae Tempest, an English spoken word performer, poet, recording artist, novelist, and playwright — a great performer by any measure. Then, in January 2022, 

I did a post on Kae’s latest book, “On Connections,” in which they extolled the importance of finding meanings in the little things.

Like most people, when I first hear about an artist, I feel like I was the one who discovered the artist.

So, I was both surprised and pleased to learn about Kae’s appearance on Jimmy Fallon’s The Tonight Show this past Monday.

— kenne

‘On Connection’   Leave a comment

‘On Connection’ delivers a message worth subscribing to

Author extolls the importance of finding meanings in the little things

“On Connection” by Sunday Times-bestselling author Kae Tempest.
Image by JACK PORCARI  
“On Connection” by Sunday Times-bestselling author Kae Tempest.
 
For musician, poet and playwright Kae Tempest, 2020 was a year to ruminate on the small details of life and find meaning in the little things.
 
In their 2020 book-length essay, “On Connection,” Tempest reveals the dangers of a polarized society out of touch with the deeper elements of life. Drawing from personal experiences, excerpts of Carl Jung’s “The Red Book” and William Blake quotes, Tempest argues that creativity — in any form we define — is a pathway to self-discovery, unity and most importantly, connection.“We have lost each other under this selfless system of hyper-competition,” they write. “Music is the great invigorator. Artists don’t make their work to inspire your collusion, your submission or your consumption of their ideals. They serve a purpose that is higher. Bigger. Deeper. Which is why you feel higher, bigger, deeper as you connect with their output.”Advertisement
 
Tempest expresses two prominent themes that call back to Jung’s “The Red Book.” These are the “spirit of the times,” or the egoist elements of oneself, and the “spirit of the depths,” or one’s inner expression of uniqueness. Tempest calls on readers to channel the depths by trying to feel the world around them a little more: they recommend taking a moment to notice the sunset, observe how the people around them are walking in tandem or listen to the sound of life around them:
 
“So
Put your phone down.
Listen to the birds.
Build a fire in a quiet place.
Pay attention to the details when you kiss your lover.”
 
Tempest says these small moments give our spirits the guidance they need: “There are many ways to access a more resonant place. It starts by acknowledging that everything is resonating.”
 
The first time I read “On Connection,” I felt a sudden wave of relief, as if Tempest was accompanying me during my moments of triumph and despair. The book felt less like an essay and more like a roadmap to mindful living; it teaches the reader how to navigate a world that is complex and exploitive, while still being in touch with the beauty of the present moment.
 
This book-length essay is perfect for anyone looking for a change of pace, something that will make readers think about life in a way they wouldn’t have otherwise. Tempest’s writing extends beyond the page, speaking to the spiritual and human truth that at our core, we are all one.
 
Tempest meditates on their past as they create a poignant and empowering narrative of self-acceptance. The author artfully weaves their story into the narrative, which opens doors for readers to reflect on the content on a deeper level.
 
Tempest delivers on their promise of making readers feel a higher, bigger and deeper connection to the truths the author spoke of.

— Jack Porcari is the senior news/features editor and can be reached at jack.porcari@ubspectrum.com

Kae Tempest — Source: Getty

Finding Peace In People’s Faces   5 comments

Kae Tempest (formerly Kate Tempest) — Source: scenestr.com

 
I’m a new fan of Kae Tempest, an English spoken word performer, poet,
recording artist, novelist, and playwright — a great performer by any measure.
 
— kenne
 
People’s Faces
 
[Verse 1]
It’s coming to pass, my country’s coming apart
The whole thing’s becoming such a bumbling farce
Was that a pivotal historical moment we just went stumbling past?
Well, here we are, dancing in the rumbling dark
So come a little closer, give me something to grasp
Give me your beautiful, crumbling heart
Another disaster, catharsis
Another half-discarded mirage
Another mask slips
I face off with the physical
My head’s ringing from the love of the stars
There is too much pretense here
Too much depends on the fragile wages
And extortionate rents here
We’re working every dread day that is given us
Feeling like the person people meet really isn’t us
Like we’re gonna buckle underneath the trouble
Like any minute now, the struggle’s going to finish us
And then we smile at all our friends
(Click Here for all Verses)

 

 
 
 

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