Archive for the ‘Madidi National Park’ Tag

Heading Down River To Rurrenabaque   Leave a comment

BoliviaTraveling down the Beni River with a few jungle stops before returning to Rurrenabaque.

Video by kenne

Last Day On The River-21-72.jpgThe bridge at Rurrenabaque, Bolivia — Images by kenne
(Click Here To See More Photos)

 

Heading Back To Rurrenabaque   Leave a comment

Last Day On The River-5-72.jpgOur Las Day In Madidi National Park — Images by kenne

The balsa wood rafts are pulled onto land and are left for anyone who might want them. Most of the supplies and camping equipment is removed and temporarily stored in the bush to make room for all of us to travel downriver to Rurrenabaque by mid-day. Pedro’s uncle will be left behind but will be picked up later. 

There is still much to do and see before catching our late afternoon flight back to La Paz. 
— kenne
‘Tis Nature’s law
That none, the meanest of created things,
Of forms created the most vile and brute,
The dullest or most noxious, should exist
Divorced from good—a spirit and pulse of good,
A life and soul to every mode of being
Inseparably linked. 
— William Wordsworth

 

 

Capybaras Near The Beni River   Leave a comment

BoliviaCapybaras Near The Beni River, Madidi National Park 

The capybara is a mammal that resembles a giant long-legged guinea pig.
It lives in groups near water, which is why we were able to see them
going down rivers in Madidi National Park. The capybara is the largest living rodent.

They are a favorite food of the jaguar, which may explain why some of our group
were able to see a jaguar that had just eaten a capybara near the river shore.

— kenne

BoliviaImages by kenne

Balsa Wood Rafting On The Tuichi River   1 comment

BoliviaBalsa Wood Rafting On the Tuichi River, Madidi National Forest — Images and Video by kenne

 

There’s A Story We Must Tell . . .   Leave a comment

BoliviaTy Instructing Matt How To Flyfish — Image by kenne

There’s a story we must tell . . .
Tom’s fly fishing rods travel with us
Everywhere we went in Bolivia.

The rods are not cheap, so we
made sure one of us always had
them with the carry-on luggage.

As fate would have it,
our river location was not
the best place for fly fishing.

Even so, why travel all this way
and not at least do some casting
over the Tuichi river waters?

Tom readied the rods and reels
for Matt to get some practice
with Ty being his instructor.

As the sun went down where
the Tuichi and Beni rivers merge
they cast over the joining waters.

The moral of the story is:
Never travel with fly fishing rods
without creating a memorial moment.

— kenne

(Click here to see more fly fishing images.)

 

 

Day Four Sunset   Leave a comment

River Sunset 8-22-19-3-72.jpgSunset Over the Tuichi and Beni Rivers (Madidi National Park)  — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The sun sets as our tents are sat up and our last dinner on the river is being prepared.
This is also where we will leave the balsa wood rafts.
The remainder of our time on the river will be on the supply boat.

— kenne

 

Nearing The End Of Our River Journey   Leave a comment

Last Camp Site On The Tuichi River-2-72.jpg

Bolivia

Last Camp Site On The Tuichi River-72.jpgCamp Site On The Tuichi River, Madidi National Park: Last Night — Images by kenne

End of The Journey

In life, some journeys are long
before the destination is reached.
Some may even take a lifetime
with breaks along the way
when we hit rocky ground,
but the end of the journey
is always profound.

— David Harris

 

Macaw Nesting Site In Madidi National Park   Leave a comment

Macow-13-72.jpgMacaw Nesting Site — Images by kenne

Madidi National Park itself contains 11% of the world’s bird species and has been recognized as one of the most diverse places on earth. Most macaw pairs breed once a year, and the female lays her eggs in a nest inside a tree hollow or in a dirt hollow on a cliff face.

MaCaw Nesting Site.jpgPedro leading the way to the Macaw nesting site.

The macaw nesting site is near the junction of the Beni and Tuichi Rivers. From the riverbank, a short trail leads to a viewing platform.  Here one can watch these impressive Red-and-green and Chestnut-fronted macaws fly, call and interact from the platform.

MaCaw Nesting Site-4.jpgThe Macaw Cliff Nesting Site — Chick Here To See More Macaw Images by kenne

 

 

Termite Nests (Nasutitermes corniger) — Madidi National Park   Leave a comment

Termit Nest-2-72.jpg

Termit Nest-72.jpgTermite Nests (Nasutitermes corniger) Madidi National Park, Bolivia — Images by kenne

The nests of N. corniger are dark brown on the surface and have small bumps over their exterior. When small (less than 20 cm in diameter) they tend to be spherical but as they grow they become more elliptical. There may also be localized lobes on the surface of the nest. The queen lives in a chamber located in the centre of the nest, (often near the tree trunk or branch to which the nest is attached), that is up to 8 cm wide and 1 cm high and heavily reinforced. The thickness of the walls in the nest decreases away from the queen and towards the exterior although if the nest is attacked by predators then the walls will be reinforced. In one study of their nests the heaviest nest identified weighed 28 kilograms and measured 68 cm by 46 cm by 34 cm. — Wikipedia

 

Balsa Wood Rafting In Madidi National Park   Leave a comment

Tucihi Day 3-17-2-72.jpgGuess Who’s Getting Splashed??

BoliviaTy Markey and Pedro Macuapa Balsa Wood Rafting In Madidi National Park — Images by kenne

By day three on the Tuichi River the water was less red and lower causing more rapids to appear going down river.
Click here to see more images.

 

 

Berraco del Madidi EcoCamp — A Photo-Essay   Leave a comment

BoliviaMatt, Tom and Ty climbing up from the Tuichi River

Berraco del Madidi EcoCamp is where we stayed our second night in Madidi National Park. This EcoCamp was founded by Pedro Macuapa, our Park advanture guide in 2007. Pedro’s vision is to use ecotourism as a mean to protect the fragile rainforest environment, employ community members, and preserve indigenous culture for future generations. 

BoliviaTom and I stayed in this tent under a ramada made of mahogany.

Berraco EcoCamp is located deeper than any other operator in the National Park, making it possible for guests to feel the real jungle, and not just to appreciate it from the edges. Our tent had two single beds with clean linens — not bad for sleeping in the jungle. 

EcoCamp-72.jpgPath leading from our ramada.

BoliviaPath to the communal toilets and showers.

We were within a short walk to communal toilets and showers. The water was not heated, so Tom had to take his first cold shower
— he claims. 

Tucihi Day 2 EcoCamp-4-72.jpgThe camp water tower.

After showering and putting on fresh clothes, we had dinner at the camp dining room. By then it was dark, perfect for our planned night walk into the jungle. The walk was 45 minutes to a watering area for animals. As we walked along the path, we came upon a coral snake that was approximately four feet. Our walk ended at the base of a high platform. After climbing up and turning off our lights, we sat listening to the jungle night. Every few minutes Pedro would shine a spotlight across the area below as huge bats crisscrossed before our eyes before turning off the light. This light show went on for about 30 minutes before we started our walk back to the camp.

BoliviaBreakfast before packing up for another day on the river.

Tucihi Day 2 EcoCamp-5-72.jpgView from the EcoCamp of the Tuichi River.

BoliviaLoading up the supply boat. Images by kenne

 

 

 

Great Black Hawk — Madidi National Park   3 comments

Great Black Hawk-72.jpgGreat Black Hawk (Madidi National Park) — Image by kenne

Rafting on the Tuichi River in the Madidi National Park is not the best way to
photograph birds high in the jungle trees, but sometimes I was able to capture one.
When I first saw this guy at a distance, I thought he was a vulture. However,
zooming in it was clear the bird was a hawk, a great black hawk.

— kenne

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