Archive for the ‘convivial society’ Tag

Pools Of Sorrow, Waves Of Joy   6 comments

Tanuri Ridge (1 of 1) blog framed“Waves of Joy” — Image by kenne
Palo Verde trees, common to the Sonoran Desert, brighten the Tucson area in the springtime with millions of five-petaled yellow blossoms.

OUR NEIGHBORHOOD — TRYING TO REASON

We traverse these streets,
sometimes early in the morning,
sometimes late in the day,
sometimes walking,
sometimes running —
always for a reason.

We wave at passersby,
sometimes we greet them,
sometimes it’s just a smile
sometimes we stop and talk,
sometimes walking together,
always for a reason.

We have neighborly expectations,
sometimes it’s watering plants,
sometimes it’s calling the ill,
sometimes it’s being complimentary,
sometimes it’s being watchful,
always for a reason.

We can be a convivial people,
sometimes we go out together,
occasionally we party together,
sometimes we join clubs together,
sometimes we share community work,
always for a reason.

We can be adversaries,
sometimes our expectations are not real,
sometimes we overreact,
sometimes we take reactions personally,
sometimes power is polarized, frustration generalized,
always for a reason.

We can be Pleasantville,
sometimes we are without color,
sometimes we are in pools of sorrow,
sometimes we are in waves of joy,
sometimes drifting through my open mind,
always for a reason.

— kenne

Tanuri Ridge (1 of 1) blog framed B-W“Pools of Sorrow” — Image by kenne

Capturing The Moment — Wolfgang, Peter And The Navajo Woman   6 comments

Wolfgang P. TheissWhen Wolfgang and I first met by the pool two years ago, we would talk about philosophy and share other common interest topics. Often, conversations would begin on whatever book he was reading by the pool.

Two years ago, Wolfgang spent about three weeks here in southern Arizona, enjoying the hot summer sun. It was not his first time visiting Tom in Tucson, and he indicated he would be visiting again next year. But, that didn’t happen – I didn’t ask why, distracted by the pleasure of seeing him again.

Since Joy and I had just returned from vacation, I assumed he had just arrived. However, he had arrived while we were gone, during which time he and Tom did a road-trip to northern Arizona and southern Utah, and was now in his last week here in the states. 

Wolfgang was anxious to share the time they spent in the Navajo Nation territory taking in some of its natural beauty. However, his most memorable moment was that of a conversation he had with a Navajo woman, whom he greeted in Navajo. Although his Navajo vocabulary is limited, she seemed to be impressed. Upon departing, she told him that when he comes back he will be able to speak in Navajo. 

“No I won’t,” Wolfgang said.

“That’s the right answer,” she replied.

Now Wolfgang has a kindred spirit in the Navajo Nation. 

As in the past, I was curious as to what Wolfgang’s poolside reading was. As the title was in German, I only know the author’s name; Peter Sloterdijk. I now plan on reading some of Sloterdijk’s work, especially learning more about his theory of the human as a practicing, training being, which may give me additional insight on why “ becoming is superior to being,” and the process of becoming (improving) as individuals and groups can result in a more convivial society.

Related to this thought, I shared a poem I first heard in the late ‘50s from my high school English teacher: 

“Good, better, best,

Never let it rest,

Till your good is better,

And your better is best.” 

This little poem has been my life’s anthem.

(Until recently, the author of the poem was unknown, but a recent Google search gives credit to professional basketball player, Tim Duncan. Look at what media exposure can do for you!)

We also talked about the concept and philosophy of “feathering,” which I will post on at a later time.

Keep on feathering, my friend.

kenne

Wolfgang P. TheissWolfgang P. Theiss — Images by kenne

Not to Worry About Terrorists, We Are Killing Ourselves!   Leave a comment

Signe Wilkinson/Philadelphia Daily News

The cover page of this morning’s Arizona Daily Star had an article on Apollo Middle School principal, Ray Chavez, and his efforts at charting a new course for the school. The article had a photo of Chavez with his hand raised, sitting a large table with students, all of which also had raised hands. The hands were raised in response to the question, “How many of you have diabetes in your family?”

In the four years Ray Chavez has been principle, he has turned the formally failing school into “performing plus” as rated by the Arizona Department of Education for the last two years. This fall Apollo will open as a community school, welcoming in families for tutoring, computer classes and fitness programs in the new fitness and wellness center, which was funded by a grant partnering with the University of Arizona and the YMCA.  “ These classes will be a nice addition and will bring families to our campus. The fitness classes are important, and there are so many elders who need to learn about computers”, said eighth-grader, Brianna Brown.

Apollo has become a model of how educational programs focusing on the whole student, which includes the family and community, can help students to take on more important roles in a more convivial society. Still, there are those who believe we need to being doing even less for our citizen’s health and education and more to fight wars and build walls along our borders. The strength and future security of this nation lies in the quality life its people are able to live.

kenne

%d bloggers like this: