Archive for the ‘Tom Turner’ Category

Nothingness   2 comments

Brother Tom at the Fish Market Window in Seattle — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Nothingness

Staring out the window
nothing comes into view,
fog drafts off the sound

It doesn’t matter
if nothing is seen,
gaze drafts afar

Even the usual seagulls
are overlooked,
even their calls

It is as if my senses
have ceased,
for the duration

Standing at the window
in my solitude,
fade into nothingness

Yet, still waiting
in my loneliness,
the vacuum to end.

— kenne

 

No Words Can Describe   1 comment

We spent some brief moments with brother Tom during our trip to Seattle for Lisa’s and Mike’s wedding on Lummi Island (August 29, 2009). 

It’s never been easy for anyone to figure out the Turner boys, let alone one to the other. In some ways,
however, if you know one of us, then you know the other. We are very much alike, but selectively taking
some similarities to an extreme (by choice and personality), which appear different.

This video is about my brother; therefore, it’s about me.

“The cat’s in the well and grief is showing its face
The world’s being slaughtered and it’s such a bloody disgrace.”

— kenne

 

 

For Crying Out Loud (September 2009)

(The video can be enlarged by clicking on HD at the top right and the four arrows in the the lower right corner.)

May 23, 1942   5 comments

Thomas R. Turner, May 23, 1942 – November 13, 2014 — Image by kenne

 

Standing above me in Smith’s

Awkwardly looking down through a clipped hesitancy

Our lives came together.

From within, mutually canceling

Vignettes of naturalness and gender-cliche.’
She kissed through closed lips of

Pristine openness.


Innocently I loved.

After my return from the war

I stepped into a world of Kafkaesque embraces; yearning . . .

Paled with particular sensations

I was momentarily blinded.

I could taste the t.s. eliot peach that I dared to eat.

Looking at you the way you love the first person

Whoever touched you

And never quite that way again

I savored my idea of you but missed the obvious.

Paradoxes betray the limits of logic

Not of the reality, we shared.

Your “passion” was stillborn through so dame necessary.

The aesthetics of my artifice went against the grain:

Recreation, utilitarian achievements, and another 
sexuality
Were hidden karmas of your soul.

My recondite preoccupations rung up as

No sale.

But let’s 

Skip the arguments.

I already know how the story ends:

A not so cryptic message –

Don’t be naive

You could only gaze into the distance at my life.


— from 24 to Harwood and Cropsey — No Road Back Home by Tom Turner

######

A Brother Lost

Now that it’s daylight at five,
I am awakened by the
Soft sounds of morning doves,

Delaying for a moment
My feet hitting the floor —
Just long enough

To think about my brother
Who no longer writes, 
Calls or returns mine. 

There’s no reason.
He has never needed
A reason to not call — 

For him,
calls need a reason, 
even made up ones —

Sharing a quote,
Name now forgotten,
Need to reach out.

Now lost in the northwest,
Imprisoned by his mind,
Lacking courage to create.

Now each day, I live with
Words no longer spoken,
Words no longer written.

— kenne 

My Introduction To Wallace Stevens   4 comments

Tom Turner (08/29/09) — Image by kenne

With so much of my knowledge of literature I was taught by my brother, Tom. In an April 26, 2003 note from him, he wrote:

“Hey . . . you
Metaphysical degenerates . . . 
Bantered alone by impulse . . . 
Here I am attempting to essay a few
coherent thoughts . . . God it’s risky!
‘God and the imagination are one.’

I am in the midst of trying to 
memorize a poem . . . ‘Final Soliloquy 
of The Interior Paramour’
by

Wallace Stevens . . . never mind why.”

Tom goes on to write about a piece by George Steiner
on memorization amid the technological revolution
where media is ubiquitous:

“The danger is that the text or music will lose
what physics calls its ‘critical mass,’ its implosive
powers within the echo chambers of the self.”

He continued — “I can really be in awe of
Shakespearean stage people in recitation
of exact lines!! Read closely . . .”

Our wills and fates do so contrary run
that our devices still are overthrown:
our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own.
(The Player King’s Crucial Speech in the Play
Within the Play — Act 3, Scene 2, 183-209-Hamlet)

I probably don’t need to tell you that Tom
never memorized the Wallace poem.

Final Soliloquy Of The Interior Paramour

Light the first light of evening, as in a room
In which we rest and, for small reason, think
The world imagined is the ultimate good.

This is, therefore, the intensest rendezvous.
It is in that thought that we collect ourselves,
Out of all the indifferences, into one thing:

Within a single thing, a single shawl
Wrapped tightly round us, since we are poor, a warmth,
A light, a power, the miraculous influence.

Here, now, we forget each other and ourselves.
We feel the obscurity of an order, a whole,
A knowledge, that which arranged the rendezvous.

Within its vital boundary, in the mind.
We say God and the imagination are one…
How high that highest candle lights the dark.

Out of this same light, out of the central mind,
We make a dwelling in the evening air,
In which being there together is enough.

— Wallace Stevens

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