Archive for the ‘Lake Titicaca’ Tag

The Captain’s Daughter   2 comments

Isla del Sol-72.jpgCaptain’s Daughter — Images by kenne

The captain of the boat that took us from Copacabana on Lake Titicaca
to the Isla del Sol had his daughter with him who was his little helper.
She was so cute with her matching colors against the lake and the clouds.

Isla del Sol-2-72.jpg

* * * * *
“As long as one and one is two
There could never be a father
Who loved his daughter more than I love you
Trust your intuition
It’s just like going fishing
You cast your line
And hope you’ll get a bite”

— from “Father and Daughter” by Paul Simon

 

Lake Titicaca Sunset   1 comment

Lake Titicaca Sunset-3-Edit-4-art-72Lake Titicaca Sunset — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Solar 

Suspended lion face
Spilling at the centre
Of an unfurnished sky
How still you stand,
And how unaided
Single stalkless flower
You pour unrecompensed.

The eye sees you
Simplified by distance
Into an origin,
Your petalled head of flames
Continuously exploding.
Heat is the echo of your
Gold.

Coined there among
Lonely horizontals
You exist openly.
Our needs hourly
Climb and return like angels.
Unclosing like a hand,
You give for ever.

— Philip Larkin

Last Day In Bolivia   Leave a comment

Lake Titicaca Sunset-2-72Lake Titicaca Sunset — Image by kenne

To see the sunset is to recall the earth.

— kenne

 

Posted September 26, 2019 by kenneturner in Bolivia, Information, Lake Titicaca, Philosophy, Photography

Tagged with , ,

Isla del Sol, Lake Titicaca (Part-Three Of A Three-Part Series)   Leave a comment

BoliviaPuerto Yuman

BoliviaPuerto Yuman

BoliviaBefore returning to Copacabana, we boarded our boat for a short ride to Puerto Yuman
where one of the island’s many ruins, a staircase up to the village of Yumani.

BoliviaAncient stairway with statues of Manco Capac and Mama Ocllo, the world’s first two Incas.

The Incas built 200 steps to aid in the climb to the top of the island.
The stairway also leads to a scared fountain said to be a fountain of youth.

BoliviaTy, Michael and Matt — Images by kenne

Because of our limited time and no transportation allowed on the island,
we missed out hiking the island trails and visiting
most of the ancient ruins and beautiful views from the top of the island.

— kenne

 

Isla del Sol, Lake Titicaca (Part-Two Of A Three-Part Series)   Leave a comment

BoliviaMichael is pointing to where most of the hotels and restaurants are on the Isla del Sol.
We docked for lunch in a cove just west of there.

BoliviaThe captain’s daughter helps tie the boat to the dock.

BoliviaLake Titicaca has 41 islands, some of which are densely populated.

Isla del Sol-23-72.jpgLunch on a deck overlooking Lake Titicaca.

BoliviaLunch On The Isla del Sol

BoliviaLunch On The Isla del Sol

Lunch On The Isla del Sol

BoliviaView of Lake Titicaca — Images by kenne

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isla del Sol, Lake Titicaca (Part-One Of A Three-Part Series)   Leave a comment

BoliviaIsla del Sol, Lake Titicaca Sunset — Photo-Artistry by kenne

In the fifteenth century, the Incas invaded the island taking control of its people at the time. Like a lot of conquerors, they created a story of Incan lore. Isla del Sol (Island of the Sun) is both the birthplace of their revered Sun God and the world’s first two Incas; Manco Capac and Mama Ocllo (the Adam and Eve of the Andes) in an attempt to not only justify their reign, but to identify themselves with the pre-existing Tiwanaku civilization whom they considered to be a great source of religious and ideological identity. This image is my attempt to capture the spirit of the Incan lore. 

Isla del Sol-3-72.jpgWalking to the boat dock.

The only way to get to Isla del Sol is via the glimmering waters of Lake Titicaca. Michael had arranged for a boat (a captain and his daughter) to take us to lunch in the Comunidad Yumani on the south side of the Isla del Sol.

Bolivia

Because of an ongoing dispute between two local communities (Comunidades Challapama and Challa) has seen the north side of the island become off-limits to foreign and domestic tourists since February 2017. The bitter feud began when the Challa community, who live roughly in the center of the island, built a series of guesthouses near a northern Inca ruin to try and earn a slice of the tourism pie. The Challapama believed the new buildings broke one of Bolivia’s laws, which relate to construction work within a certain distance of sacred sites. After an unsuccessful attempt to appeal through bureaucratic means, the folks of Challapampa decided to resolve the matter vigilante-style by blowing the guesthouses to smithereens with a dose of dynamite. The stand-off remains.

Isla del Sol-7-72.jpgLeaving Copacabana

Isla del Sol-5-72.jpgTom, Ty and Michael

On the boat ride, we spent most of the time drinking Singani and Altbier and resulting in drinking conversations.

Bolivia

The terrace landscape reflects the Inca influence on the Lake Titicaca agriculture.

BoliviaImages and Video by kenne (This Is Part-One of a Three-Part Series on Isla del Sol)

— kenne

 

Blessing Of The Automobiles   Leave a comment

Bolivia

Since the 1950s, Copacabana has become a focal point of this modern-day Bolivian pilgrimage
known as the Bendición de Movilidades (Blessing of the Automobiles). 

BoliviaMichael is explaining the ceremony to Ty and Matt.

Every weekend and most weekdays, new car owners
from Bolivia and Peru will line-up the cars to be blessed. 

Basiluca of Our Lady of Copabana Car Blessing-12-72.jpg

BoliviaA priest who sprinkles beer on the each car while reciting a prayer.

BoliviaThe owners decorate their vehicle and often have champagne to celebrate the event, often by spraying the vehicle.

BoliviaVenders under blue tents are selling plastic and fresh flowers colorful streamers, pinwheels and hats.

BoliviaMichael buying some Bolivian popcorn — Images by kenne

 

La Morenada Traditional Dancer   Leave a comment

Basiluca of Our Lady of Copabana-10-2-Edit-1-art-2-72.jpgLa Morenada Traditional Dancer — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The word “moreno” means “dark” in Spanish. This music and its dance are from La Paz and involve a lot of drums and rattles. Over the years trumpets, trombones and cymbals were added. This traditional Bolivian dance also originated with the African slaves brought to Bolivia from Africa to work on haciendas; however, this music comes from the area of Lake Titicaca, high on the Bolivian Altiplano (the high plateau that surrounds La Paz) not the tropical Yungas region.https://www.boliviabella.com/bolivian-music-types.html

La Morenada   1 comment

Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana-12-72.jpgBasilica of Our Lady of Copacabana

When we arrived in Copacabana near the Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana
we could hear a brass band playing in the Basilica’s plaza.
Clearly, on this sunny Saturday morning, a ceremony of some sort was taking place.

BoliviaOnce we were inside the plaza there were women and men of all ages
in very colorful customs dancing to the music.

Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana-9-72.jpgThe dance is a traditional dance in Bolivia called La Morenada.
Anthropologists say the dance is a satire, inspired by the suffering of black slaves
who were brought to Bolivia to work in the Andean silver mines. 

Bolivia

La Morenada is easily recognizable in a procession because it has various characteristics:

Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana-7-72.jpg
There are many rattles and drums, groups of women are dressed
in polleras (multilayered skirts) with bowler hats,
while men wear costumes that supposedly represent barrels
and wear silver or black masks (Morenada means ‘black’).

The origin of La Morenada stems from Lake Titicaca,
based on 200/300-year-old cave paintings found there, depicting these dances.

Video and Images by kenne

 

Copacabana, Bolivia — Lake Titicaca   Leave a comment

BoliviaCopacabana, Bolivia On Lake Titicaca — Image by kenne

In the green morning
I wanted to be a heart.
A heart.And in the ripe evening
I wanted to be a nightingale.
A nightingale.

(Soul,
turn orange-colored.
Soul,
turn the color of love.)

In the vivid morning
I wanted to be myself.
A heart.

And at the evening’s end
I wanted to be my voice.
A nightingale.

Soul,
turn orange-colored.
Soul,
turn the color of love.

— Federico García Lorca

On The Road To Copacabana, Bolivia   Leave a comment

BoliviaCut Flowers, Tquina, Bolivia — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“I must have flowers, always, and always.”

— Claude Monet

Lake Titicaca Sunset   Leave a comment

Lake Titicaca Sunset-Edit-2-art-72.jpgLake Titicaca Sunset — Photo-Artistry by kenne

High atop the Andes, between Bolivia and Peru,
sits the birthplace of the Incas, sacred Lake Titicaca.
A powerhouse of nature through and through,
it was created by the Inca god of the lake, Viracocha.

— from “Sacred Lake Titicaca” by Pandita Sanchez

 

%d bloggers like this: