Bad Day On Lemmon Rock   7 comments

Lemmon Rock Trail (1 of 1) blog

Pusch Ridge Wilderness — Image by kenne

BAD DAY ON LEMMON ROCK

The wilderness area of the Santa Catalina Mountains
provides many beautiful vistas, massive majestic
rock formations and several challenging hiking trails.

For the start of the fall hiking season,
the naturalists scheduled a hike starting
at the highest point atop Mount Lemmon.

In a prologue to frost and early fall colors,
we arranged a shuttle car at Marshall Gulch
so not to double back the six and a half-mile hike.

Having led this hike two months ago,
it combines four trails leading down into and out
of the Pusch Ridge Wilderness to Marshall Gulch.

Beginning on the Mount Lemmon trail,Wilderness Rock Trail 09-01-14-3658Lemmon Rock Lookout blog
we follow a forest service road through
upper mountain meadows to the Lemmon Rock trail.

The two rocky trails provide a steep 1,800-foot drop
through tall pines on rocky slopes lined with thorny shrubs
with an occasional cairn marking the many switchbacks.

However, cairns are of little help if I misread
a marker and attempts to create my own trail
down an even steeper rocky slope.

Taking a wrong turn at a trail marker,
which was about an hour into the hike,

was the beginning of my bad day on Lemmon Rock.

It quickly became apparent my pace was too fast
for the rocky slope, I was proceeding down, planting
my right foot, so to begin a slide, only to twist my ankle.

The pain told me this was not a slight twist of the ankle —
Oh, SHIT! SHIT! SHIT! Holding back additional profanity,
I quickly started getting up, checking out the damage.

Anyone who hikes with me knows I usually
have my four-pound camera/lens on
the left shoulder, which I balance with the left hand.

Not this time, since I was wearing
a center-body camera harness —
for the first time, not focusing on saving my camera.

In pain, I did a four-point crawl up to the trail
after answering some ankle movement questions
from a fellow hiker, a retired foot doctor.

Continuing to walk on the rocky trail was difficult —
generating expressions of concern from everyone,
some checking their backpacks for an ankle wraps.

Someone had a velcro Ace bandage,
without which I would not have been able
to continue the remaining five miles to the gulch.

The ankle wrap was a blessing, but having now
given the experience, more thought, although a steep climb,
the shorted hike would have been back up to the top.

We live and learn, or do we?
Would I hike five miles again on a sprained ankle?
I hope I never have to face the question.

How here I sit with my wrapped
black and blue swollen ankle iced down —
I guess I won’t be hiking again soon.

— kenne “Wrong-turn” Turner

springed ankle (1 of 1)-2 blogSprained Ankle — Image by Jeff

 

7 responses to “Bad Day On Lemmon Rock

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  1. Ooouch. You did well to complete that walk. Think I’ll take a cautionary and start keeping a velcro or two in my rucksack. Despite the pain you have turned it into a well told tale.

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  2. Sorry you sprained your ankle on Friday… Hope you feeling better. You still beat me down on the hike by over an hour. Jeff

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  3. God bedring💞 ta vare på deg selv😄 klemmer og gode tanker til deg💞

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  4. Reblogged this on Becoming is Superior to Being and commented:

    Having the nickname “Wrong-turn Turner” didn’t come about without reason. — kenne

    Liked by 1 person

  5. You were a determined hiker to finish that trail. Do hope you rest that ankle for a while. Take some pictures from your patio.

    Like

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